Waste To Ethanol Biofuel Process Could Reduce Trash In Landfills And Fuel Your Car

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Remember at the end of Back To The Future when Doc Brown returns to 1985 from 2015 with an upgraded DeLorean that could fly and was powered by garbage? Remember how crazy it seemed that in 2015 a car could possibly be powered by household trash? The real crazy thing is it’s about to become a reality. By 2011, Enerkem, Inc, a Canadian based company, will be opening their first trash-to-ethanol plant in Edmonton, with many more to follow.Landfill Waste Ethanol

Remember at the end of Back To The Future when Doc Brown returns to 1985 from 2015, and he’s driving an upgraded DeLorean that could fly and was powered by garbage? Remember how crazy it seemed to think in 2015 a car could possibly be powered by household trash? The real crazy thing is it’s about to become a reality. By 2011, Enerkem, Inc, a Canadian based company, will be opening their first trash-to-ethanol plant in Edmonton, with many more to follow. Although the process is a little different than in Back To The Future, the essence is still the same: household trash gets diverted from landfills, mixed with biomass, turned into gas at 400° centigrade, fuels the plant, and produces ethanol or other second generation biofuels. The only thing remaining from the process is an ashy substance that can either be deposited in landfills, or used as an ingredient in concrete. So, if we’ve found a way to power vehicles with garbage by now, are flying cars just around the corner?

  • Ian Andrew

    As the Co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Greener Ideal, Ian has been a driving force in environmental journalism and sustainable lifestyle advocacy since 2008. With over a decade of dedicated involvement in environmental matters, Ian has established himself as a respected expert in the field. Under his leadership, Greener Ideal has consistently delivered independent news and insightful content that empowers readers to engage with and understand pressing environmental issues.

    Ian’s expertise extends beyond editorial leadership; his hands-on experience in exploring and implementing sustainable practices equips him with practical knowledge that resonates with both industry professionals and eco-conscious audiences. This blend of direct involvement and editorial oversight has positioned Ian as a credible and authoritative voice in environmental journalism and sustainable living.

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