Pharmaceuticals and Medicine Found In Fish Across U.S.

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It seems that mercury isn’t the only thing we have to be worried about winding up in our fish. A recent testing of fish near 5 major cities in the United States showed traces of medicine used to treat cholesterol, allergies, blood pressure, and even bipolar disorder and depression. Realizing this, the EPA has ordered testing to be done in 150 more locations. Fish Pharmaceuticals Medicines

It seems that mercury isn’t the only thing we have to be worried about winding up in our fish. A recent testing of fish near 5 major cities in the United States showed traces of medicine used to treat cholesterol, allergies, blood pressure, and even bipolar disorder and depression. Realizing this, the EPA has ordered testing to be done in 150 more locations. Although the researchers say a human would have to eat hundreds of thousands of fish dinners to get a single therapeutic dose, there are still rather high concentrations in fish and other aquatic species, and the Associated Press has reported traces of pharmaceuticals making it into the drinking water provided to at least 46 million Americans. The message this should send to people however is that our water resources are limited, and we need to do more to protect exactly what is going into the water which we’ll inevitably be reusing. But whatever you do, don’t take this as a suggestion to start drinking more bottled water.

  • Ian Andrew

    As the Co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Greener Ideal, Ian has been a driving force in environmental journalism and sustainable lifestyle advocacy since 2008. With over a decade of dedicated involvement in environmental matters, Ian has established himself as a respected expert in the field. Under his leadership, Greener Ideal has consistently delivered independent news and insightful content that empowers readers to engage with and understand pressing environmental issues.

    Ian’s expertise extends beyond editorial leadership; his hands-on experience in exploring and implementing sustainable practices equips him with practical knowledge that resonates with both industry professionals and eco-conscious audiences. This blend of direct involvement and editorial oversight has positioned Ian as a credible and authoritative voice in environmental journalism and sustainable living.

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