Carbon Sequestering Could Trap CO2 Under The North Sea

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Right now, there is a race to find the fastest and easiest way to sequester carbon into the earth. Some scientists think it’s best to trap it in rocks on the surface, some think it’s best to trap it even deeper into the earth’s core, and now, a group of researchers think it is best to trap it in rocks under Scotland’s North Sea.Carbon Sequestering


Right now, there is a race to find the fastest and easiest way to sequester carbon into the earth. Some scientists think it’s best to trap it in rocks on the surface, some think it’s best to trap it even deeper into the earth’s core, and now, a group of researchers think it is best to trap it in rocks under Scotland’s North Sea. Carbon sequestering, or Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is one of the global warming solutions which is gaining steam the fastest, and if this new research proves true, Britain’s power stations may be able to store up to 46 billion tonnes of CO2 in the North Sea rocks.


The process would be carried out by oil rigs which have the capabilities to pump it into the layers of sandstone at the bottom of the sea. Although it is still a long ways from being put into place, CCS advancements seem to be speeding up every day. Is this a viable solution to solving our climate problems?
Photo credit: National Geographic Magazine

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