Changing The Way The Brain Thinks About Climate Change

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Why hasn’t our response to global warming and climate change been sufficient enough? There’s a lot of reasons, but all of them stem from human behaviour. An organization called CRED or Center for Research on Environmental Decisions, has been testing people to see how we think about climate change, and what reactions we’re expected to take because of it.Climate Change Research Thought


Why hasn’t our response to global warming and climate change been sufficient enough? There’s a lot of reasons, but all of them stem from human behaviour. An organization called CRED or Center for Research on Environmental Decisions, has been testing people to see how we think about climate change, and what reactions we’re expected to take because of it.


In most cases, the findings aren’t inspiring: we’re dismissive of negative news, or reject long-term thinking models. But even in the studies with pessimistic results, researchers at CRED and Columbia University are learning most results are based on how the questions are phrased – a psychological factor which may prove useful when governments or organizations try to garner support for things such as carbon offsets or taxes, energy smart meters, or passing bills to protect the environment.


Click here to read Jon Gertner’s entire fascinating article in the New York Times, and leave your thoughts on this approach to gaining support for combatting climate change in the comments.



Photo credits: Stephen Wilkes for the New York Times

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