NASA Global Warming Satellite Crashes, with Video

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There was bad news for NASA yesterday when the satellite it had launched to monitor carbon dioxide crashed to Earth just after launch. The unsuccessful satellite fell to the ocean near Antarctica yesterday, seriously setting back the team that intended to gather results on humanity’s impact on global warming.nasa satellite crashThere was bad news for NASA yesterday when the satellite it had launched to monitor carbon dioxide crashed to Earth just after launch. The unsuccessful satellite fell to the ocean near Antarctica yesterday, seriously setting back the team that intended to gather results on humanity’s impact on global warming. The problem arose when the satellite never shed its protective coating, and as a result couldn’t maintain enough speed to make it out of the atmosphere. The biggest drag is that the price of the glitch was a whopping $280 million. This problem may even delay the launch of NASA’s second environmental satellite, dubbed Gloria, which was supposed to take off in October. Check the replies for a video of the launch.



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