Lafarge-Sugar Creek Cement To Be Powered By Landfill Gas

Updated On

We may collect a share of sales from items linked to on this page. Learn more.

A new waste-to-energy plant is being opened in the United States, but unlike others, all of the energy produced by this one will be used to create cement. The Lafarge-Sugar Creek Cement plant in Missouri is going to be using landfill gas to replace about 20% of its coal burning power and cut down its CO2 emissions by an estimated 33,000 tonnes every year.Cement Plant Landfill Gas

A new waste-to-energy plant is being opened in the United States, but unlike others, all of the energy produced by this one will be used to create cement. The Lafarge-Sugar Creek Cement plant in Missouri is going to be using landfill gas to replace about 20% of its coal burning power and cut down its CO2 emissions by an estimated 33,000 tonnes every year. The project will cost around $2 million dollars, and will include 32 wells, each 100 ft deep, and a 6,500 foot pipeline to transfer the gas from the landfill to the cement plant. Although the methane from the landfill will only be able to replace 20% of the plant’s energy needs, methane is 23 times more efficient than carbon dioxide, and will be a much cleaner power source. Hopefully this trend will continue in the cement industry.

  • Ian Andrew

    As the Co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Greener Ideal, Ian has been a driving force in environmental journalism and sustainable lifestyle advocacy since 2008. With over a decade of dedicated involvement in environmental matters, Ian has established himself as a respected expert in the field. Under his leadership, Greener Ideal has consistently delivered independent news and insightful content that empowers readers to engage with and understand pressing environmental issues.

    Ian’s expertise extends beyond editorial leadership; his hands-on experience in exploring and implementing sustainable practices equips him with practical knowledge that resonates with both industry professionals and eco-conscious audiences. This blend of direct involvement and editorial oversight has positioned Ian as a credible and authoritative voice in environmental journalism and sustainable living.

What do you think? Leave a comment!