Pollution In The Black Sea Is A Renewable Energy Source?

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Sometimes energy sources can be found in the funniest places. Take for example the Black Sea. It is the source of organic matter and waste runoff from 17 countries, contains very little oxygen, and hosts a kind of bacteria that survives off of the sulfate in the water.Black Sea Pollution Energy

Sometimes energy sources can be found in the funniest places. Take for example the Black Sea. It is the source of organic matter and waste runoff from 17 countries, contains very little oxygen, and hosts a kind of bacteria that survives off of the sulfate in the water. But this unique combination of things might just prove to be an environmental benefit, according to some researchers. Because of the lack of oxygen, and the bacteria that produces hydrogen sulfide (the gas that smells like rotten eggs), there is an enormous amount of hydrogen gas that could be collected from the sea every day. In fact, about 500 tonnes of it per day. The next step in making this idea a reality is creating solar powered plants to separate the hydrogen from the sulfate. It sounds like another great waste-to-energy solution in the making.

  • Ian Andrew

    As the Co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Greener Ideal, Ian has been a driving force in environmental journalism and sustainable lifestyle advocacy since 2008. With over a decade of dedicated involvement in environmental matters, Ian has established himself as a respected expert in the field. Under his leadership, Greener Ideal has consistently delivered independent news and insightful content that empowers readers to engage with and understand pressing environmental issues.

    Ian’s expertise extends beyond editorial leadership; his hands-on experience in exploring and implementing sustainable practices equips him with practical knowledge that resonates with both industry professionals and eco-conscious audiences. This blend of direct involvement and editorial oversight has positioned Ian as a credible and authoritative voice in environmental journalism and sustainable living.

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