New Solar Cells To Mimic Photosynthesis

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Some of the best green designs are the ones inspired by nature. Of course, to make them work properly, we sometimes need a little bit of nanotechnology to help us along. Such is the case with a new batch of solar cells being designed at the University of Southampton.Solar Cell Photosynthesis

Some of the best green designs are the ones inspired by nature. Of course, to make them work properly, we sometimes need a little bit of nanotechnology to help us along. Such is the case with a new batch of solar cells being designed at the University of Southampton. Everyone knows plants have always turned sunlight into energy through photosynthesis, but what Professor Pavlos Lagoudakis of the Physics and Astronomy School wanted to know was how it could be so efficient. Through reverse engineering, he and his team learned how it could be recreated it, and did so by modeling nano-molecules after the functional molecules in plants. This discovery could lead to one of, if not the most, energy efficient and environmentally sustainable ways to produce energy.

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