SuperMarket Fridges & Freezers: Huge CO2 Footprint

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It’s one of those things that makes complete sense once you stop to think about it, but that otherwise would go unnoticed: grocery store fridges and freezers waste a ton of energy.It’s one of those things that makes complete sense once you stop to think about it, but that otherwise would go unnoticed: grocery store fridges and freezers waste a ton of energy. For starters, just think about the open air aisles pumping out cold air to keep cheese, eggs, and juice cold. And that’s not even mentioning the real frozen foods aisles. The Herald recently reported that these fridges and freezers are cranking out a ton of HFCs, which have 4000 times more impact on global warming than CO2 does. Fridges and freezers make up around 30% of a grocery store’s entire carbon footprint, but according to the Herald, neither the stores themselves, or the fridge/freezer manufacturers are planning to do anything to stop it anytime soon. Isn’t it time we found a more efficient, and environmentally friendly, way to store cold foods in our supermarkets?

  • Ian Andrew

    As the Co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Greener Ideal, Ian has been a driving force in environmental journalism and sustainable lifestyle advocacy since 2008. With over a decade of dedicated involvement in environmental matters, Ian has established himself as a respected expert in the field. Under his leadership, Greener Ideal has consistently delivered independent news and insightful content that empowers readers to engage with and understand pressing environmental issues.

    Ian’s expertise extends beyond editorial leadership; his hands-on experience in exploring and implementing sustainable practices equips him with practical knowledge that resonates with both industry professionals and eco-conscious audiences. This blend of direct involvement and editorial oversight has positioned Ian as a credible and authoritative voice in environmental journalism and sustainable living.

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